Art and Faith

Monday, 19 January 2009

Ivan Eggink. A Portrait of P. A. Zubov. beginning of the 19th century

Filed under: 19th century,fine art,human study,portrait,Russian — 01varvara @ 00.00

A Portrait of P. A. Zubov (Ivan Eggink, beginning of the 19th century)

Ivan Eggink. Grand Prince St Vladimir Examines the Faith. undated (first quarter of the 19th century?)

Grand Prince St Vladimir Examines the Faith (Ivan Eggink, undated (first quarter of the 19th century?))

Of course, this depiction is highly stylised, but, it does symbolise the fact that Grand Prince St Vladimir chose Orthodoxy over Roman Catholicism in 988. Do not forget that St Vladimir consciously rejected both Islam and Roman Catholicism… he was not merely ignorant of them. The former he considered too fanatical (for it forbade liquor) and the latter he found confusing (for his emissaries were not impressed with RC liturgy, finding it irreverent). Orthodoxy both he and his ambassadors found “just right” (“We did not know if we were in heaven or on earth”, in regards to the liturgy at Agia Sofia).

Russia is deeply Orthodox to this day… and shall remain so until the Last Trump, I am sure (Am I Orthodox? Well… I’m Russian… does that answer your question?).

Ivan Eggink. A Portrait of the Writer I. A. Krylov. 1834

Filed under: 19th century,fine art,human study,portrait,Russian — 01varvara @ 00.00

A Portrait of the Writer I. A. Krylov (Ivan Eggink, 1834)

Krylov is a houehold word in Russia, for he made a famous collection of fairy tales that is still in print.

Firs Zhuravlyov. A Replete Table. undated (1860s-80s)

Filed under: 19th century,domestic,fine art,human study,Russian,town scene — 01varvara @ 00.00

A Replete Table (Firs Zhuravlyov, undated (1860s-80s))

This painting reminds you of a Hogarth engraving, does it not? There is the same exaggerated satire, the same biting observation of sinful–ginful humanity. Obviously, this is a depiction of  a party held by a lower official or the lower kind of merchnt. Certainly, it is not a gathering of the local gentry!

Indeed, it appears to be a cutting artistic comment on the “new men” of the period. This is GLUTTONY. Note well that the priest and deacon are sitting near the host and they are stuffing themselves as cheerfully as the rest. One can see the artist holding his nose as he stands at his easel…

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