Art and Faith

Sunday, 21 September 2008

Konstantin Makovsky. The Call to Arms of Kuzma Minin in Novogorod in 1611. 1879

The Call to Arms of Kuzma Minin in Novgorod in 1611

Konstantin Makovsky

1879

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This illustrates one of the most pivotal episodes in Russian history. The Poles invaded Russia during the Smuta (Time of Troubles) after the death of Tsar Boris Gudunov. They attempted to place a Catholic Pole on the Russian throne and wanted to ram the Unia down the throats of the Russian people, to make them submit to the Pope of Rome. Quite obviously, this led to a Russian national awakening. The opolchenie (militia) came to arms under the leadership of the boyar Dmitri Pozharsky and the butcher Kuzma Minin. The Poles, after hard fighting and a long siege, were defeated, and Russia and Orthodoxy were preserved from destruction. Any time you hear a Pole downing Russia, remember, they started the fight, we finished it. They attempted to force their religion upon us, and we not only rejected them, we threw them out. There’s a reason for their hatred… they attempted to murder us as a people and we foiled them. Sic semper tyrannis!

BMD

Konstantin Makovsky. Bulgarian Martyrs. 1877

Konstantin Makovsky. Bulgarian Martyrs. 1877

Bulgarian Martyrs

Konstantin Makovsky

1877

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Such events as those pictured in the painting did occur in the Ottoman-ruled Balkans. The worst of the Ottoman bullyboys were the Albanians, who had a reputation for cruelty, barbarity, and rapine, yet, they often showed cowardice in open battle. Not much has changed in that regard, has it? The locals welcomed the Russian troops as liberators from Turkish oppression wherever they went. The ordinary people of the Balkans have never forgotten that the Russians freed them from slavery. Only small minorities of the so-called local élites support the USA and its militant nihilism. The vast majority of Balkan people still support Russia and Orthodoxy. NATO had best not count on any of its Balkan members; they’re in for a rude surprise…

BMD

Thursday, 5 June 2008

Yuly Klever. Sunrise in Winter. 1897

Sunrise in Winter

Yuly Klever

1897

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Bill, do I ever have a suggestion for you! No doubt, you sometimes find yourself in the company of a boring pseudo-artist who’s always trying to one-up you. Well… I don’t think that the average American art-phony has ever heard of Klever or Makovsky or any other artist I feature on this site. If someone tires to bamboozle you, just say, “I’m emulating the play with light found in Klever”. They’ll have NO idea of what you are talking about… but they’ll never admit it! Betcha you’ll hear tons of certifiable BS… until you pull out the laptop and pull up one of these posts.

I knew you’d LOVE my idea, Bill…

BMD

Konstantin Makovsky. A Boyar Wedding Feast in the 17th Century. 1883

A Boyar Wedding Feast in the 17th Century

Konstantin Makovsky

1883

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This is, perhaps, the most famous Russian “wedding” painting. One can almost hear the ribald and earthy comments of the guests. There’s an interesting juxtaposition of virginal innocence and randy raunchiness in this painting. It rewards a second look, I say.

BMD

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