Art and Faith

Monday, 3 December 2007

Vasili Belyaev. Central Mosaics of the Khram Spasa na Krovi (Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood). St Petersburg RF. undated (1890s)

Central Mosaics of the Khram Spasa na Krovi (Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood)

Vasili Belyaev

undated (1890s?)

Khram Spasa na Krovi (Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood)

St Petersburg (Federal City of St Petersburg. Northwestern Federal DistrictRF

______________________________

There’s no need to say anything concerning this work. It speaks for itself. This church was built on the spot were Tsar Aleksandr Nikolaevich was assasinated by anarchist terrorists in 1881. That’s why it’s called the Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood. By the way, the new memorial church dedicated to the Royal Martyrs in Yekaterinburg bears almost the same name.

BMD

Vasili Belyaev. Protection of the Most Holy Mother of God. Khram Spasa na Krovi (Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood). St Petersburg RF. undated (1890s)

Protection of the Most Holy Mother of God

Vasili Belyaev

undated (1890s?)

Khram Spasa na Krovi (Church of the Saviour on the Spilt Blood)

St Petersburg (Federal City of St Petersburg. Northwestern Federal DistrictRF

______________________________

There was excellent response to my posting of the mosaics of the Spasa na Krovi, so, here’s another example of the mosaic work in that church. It’s simply stunning, isn’t it? No doubt, you can see why I detest those who attack such work as “too Western”. If this doesn’t move you to tears by its beauty (you needn’t be a believer to see that!), you have no soul.

BMD

Andrei Ryabushkin. A Deacon. 1888

A Deacon

Andrei Ryabushkin

1888

______________________________

Last week, we showcased hunting paintings. This week, the theme is “Russian clergy”. The paintings shall come from various eras, and shall basically be portraits, not “human studies” (you painters out there know the difference!).

In the Russian church, the deacon has always played a larger role than his counterparts in the western confessions. The deacon intones the litanies, reads the Gospel, and plays a major role in the liturgy (especially when a hierarch serves). Often, he is chosen for his vocal abilities. In Russia, the deacon is often chosen for such service if he has a powerful and well-projected bass voice. This is one of the “signature” sounds of the Russian liturgy, the interplay between the basso intonations of the deacon and the sound of a well-trained choir singing the responses in harmony. Even unbelievers attest to the beauty of this combination.

Let all catechumens depart! All catechumens depart! Let no catechumen remain! Let us, the faithful, again and again, in peace, pray unto the Lord! (the deacon’s exclamation at end of the Litany for the Cathecumens)

BMD

The Countryside Beckons (with the song “Alyosha”)

The rural-themed late Soviet neo-Impressionist art of Sergei and Aleksei Tkachyov is paired with a popular Soviet-era song Alyosha (that is the diminutive of Aleksei in Russian). The mood of the song fits this art, I would say.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.